Author: Burt, G.
Paper Title Page
MOPGW094 First Machine Developments Result with HL-LHC Crab Cavities in the SPS 338
 
  • L.R. Carver, A. Alekou, F. Antoniou, H. Bartosik, T. Bohl, R. Calaga, M. Carlà, T.E. Levens, G. Papotti
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
  • A. Alekou, R.B. Appleby, R.B. Appleby
    UMAN, Manchester, United Kingdom
  • G. Burt
    Cockcroft Institute, Warrington, Cheshire, United Kingdom
  • G. Burt, J.A. Mitchell
    Lancaster University, Lancaster, United Kingdom
  • C.P. Welsch
    The University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom
 
  Crab cavities are a critical component within the High Luminosity upgrade project for the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC). It is foreseen to use crab cavities in order to compensate the geometric luminosity reduction factor (reduction of the luminous region at the Interaction Point [IP]) due to the beam crossing angle (required for minimizing the impact of the long range beam-beam effects on the single particle beam dynamics) and increase the number of collisions per bunch crossing. In 2018 the first beam tests of crab cavities with protons were performed in the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at CERN. Two vertical superconducting cavities of the Double Quarter Wave (DQW) type were fabricated and installed in the SPS to verify some key components of the cavity design and operation. This paper will present some of the first results relating to the proton beam dynamics in the presence of crab cavities.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2019-MOPGW094  
About • paper received ※ 25 April 2019       paper accepted ※ 20 May 2019       issue date ※ 21 June 2019  
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WEPRB068 Ka-Band Linearizer Studies for a Compact Light Source 2976
 
  • A. Castilla, G. Burt, W.L. Millar
    Cockcroft Institute, Lancaster University, Lancaster, United Kingdom
  • A. Latina, X. Liu, W.L. Millar, X.W. Wu, W. Wuensch
    CERN, Meyrin, Switzerland
 
  Funding: This project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 777431.
The CompactLight project is currently developing the design of a next generation hard X-ray FEL facility, based on high-gradient X-band (12 GHz) structures, bright electron photo-injectors, and compact short period undulators. However, to improve the brightness limitations due to the non-linear energy spread of the electron bunches, a K-band (36 GHz) linearizer is being considered to provide a harmonic compensation during the bunch compression. In this paper, we analyze the feasibility of such linearizer.
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2019-WEPRB068  
About • paper received ※ 15 May 2019       paper accepted ※ 22 May 2019       issue date ※ 21 June 2019  
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WEPRB098 Cryogenic RF Performance of Double-Quarter Wave Cavities Equipped with HOM Filters 3043
 
  • S. Verdú-Andrés, I. Ben-Zvi, Q. Wu, B. P. Xiao
    BNL, Upton, Long Island, New York, USA
  • I. Ben-Zvi
    Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, USA
  • G. Burt
    Cockcroft Institute, Lancaster University, Lancaster, United Kingdom
  • G. Burt, J.A. Mitchell
    Lancaster University, Lancaster, United Kingdom
  • R. Calaga, O. Capatina
    CERN, Meyrin, Switzerland
  • N.A. Huque, E.A. McEwen, H. Park, T. Powers
    JLab, Newport News, Virginia, USA
  • Z. Li, A. Ratti
    SLAC, Menlo Park, California, USA
 
  Funding: Work supported by US DOE through BSA LLC under contracts No. DE-AC02-98CH10886, No. DE-SC0012704, and the US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) and by the EU HL-LHC Project.
Crab cavities are one of the several components included in the luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC). The cavities have to provide a nominal deflecting kick of 3.4 MV per cavity while the cryogenic load per cavity stays below 5 W. Cold RF tests confirmed the required performances in bare cavities, with several cavities exceeding the required voltage by more than 50%. However, the first tests of a Double-Quarter Wave (DQW) cavity with one out of three HOM filters did not reach the required voltage. The present paper describes the studies and tests conducted on a DQW cavity with HOM filter to understand the limiting factor. The recipe to meet the performance specification and exceed the voltage requirement by more than 35% is discussed.
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2019-WEPRB098  
About • paper received ※ 15 May 2019       paper accepted ※ 22 May 2019       issue date ※ 21 June 2019  
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TUPRB032 The CompactLight Design Study Project 1756
 
  • G. D’Auria, S. Di Mitri, R.A. Rochow
    Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Basovizza, Italy
  • M. Aicheler
    HIP, University of Helsinki, Finland
  • A.A. Aksoy
    Ankara University, Accelerator Technologies Institute, Golbasi, Turkey
  • D. Alesini, M. Bellaveglia, B. Buonomo, F. Cardelli, M. Croia, M. Diomede, M. Ferrario, A. Gallo, A. Giribono, L. Piersanti, B. Spataro, C. Vaccarezza
    INFN/LNF, Frascati, Italy
  • R. Apsimon, A. Castilla
    Cockcroft Institute, Lancaster University, Lancaster, United Kingdom
  • J.M. Arnesano, F. Bosco, L. Ficcadenti, A. Mostacci, L. Palumbo
    Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy
  • A. Bernhard, J. Gethmann
    KIT, Karlsruhe, Germany
  • G. Burt
    Lancaster University, Lancaster, United Kingdom
  • M. Calvi, T. Schmidt, K. Zhang
    PSI, Villigen PSI, Switzerland
  • H.M. Castaneda Cortes, J.A. Clarke, D.J. Dunning, N. Thompson
    STFC/DL/ASTeC, Daresbury, Warrington, Cheshire, United Kingdom
  • A.W. Cross, L. Zhang
    USTRAT/SUPA, Glasgow, United Kingdom
  • G. Dattoli, F. Nguyen, A. Petralia
    ENEA C.R. Frascati, Frascati (Roma), Italy
  • R.T. Dowd, D. Zhu
    AS - ANSTO, Clayton, Australia
  • W.D. Fang
    SINAP, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China
  • A. Faus-Golfe, Y. Han
    LAL, Orsay, France
  • E.N. Gazis, N. Gazis
    National Technical University of Athens, Zografou, Greece
  • R. Geometrante, M. Kokole
    KYMA, Trieste, Italy
  • V.A. Goryashko, M. Jacewicz, R.J.M.Y. Ruber
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden
  • X.J.A. Janssen, J.M.A. Priem
    VDL ETG, Eindhoven, The Netherlands
  • A. Latina, X. Liu, C. Rossi, D. Schulte, S. Stapnes, X.W. Wu, W. Wuensch
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
  • O.J. Luiten, P.H.A. Mutsaers, X.F.D. Stragier
    TUE, Eindhoven, The Netherlands
  • J. Marcos, E. Marín, R. Muñoz Horta, F. Pérez
    ALBA-CELLS Synchrotron, Cerdanyola del Vallès, Spain
  • G. Taylor
    The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
 
  Funding: This project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 777431
The H2020 CompactLight Project (www. CompactLight.eu) aims at designing the next generation of compact X-rays Free-Electron Lasers, relying on very high gradient accelerating structures (X-band, 12 GHz), the most advanced concepts for bright electron photo injectors, and innovative compact short-period undulators. Compared to existing facilities, the proposed facility will benefit from a lower electron beam energy, due to the enhanced undulators performance, and will be significantly more compact, with a smaller footprint,  as a consequence of the lower energy and the high-gradient X-band structures. In addition, the whole infrastructure will also have a lower electrical power demand as well as lower construction and running costs.
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2019-TUPRB032  
About • paper received ※ 15 May 2019       paper accepted ※ 22 May 2019       issue date ※ 21 June 2019  
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THPMP038 Collaborative Strategies for Meeting the Global Need for Cancer Radiation Therapy Treatment Systems 3526
 
  • M. Dosanjh, P. Collier, I. Syratchev, W. Wuensch
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
  • A. Aggarwal
    KCL, London, United Kingdom
  • D. Angal-Kalinin, P.A. McIntosh, B.L. Militsyn
    STFC/DL/ASTeC, Daresbury, Warrington, Cheshire, United Kingdom
  • R. Apsimon
    Cockcroft Institute, Lancaster University, Lancaster, United Kingdom
  • S.T. Boogert
    Royal Holloway, University of London, Surrey, United Kingdom
  • G. Burt
    Lancaster University, Lancaster, United Kingdom
  • N. Coleman, D.A. Pistenmaa
    ICEC, Washington, DC, USA
  • A.W. Cross
    USTRAT/SUPA, Glasgow, United Kingdom
  • I.V. Konoplev, S.L. Sheehy
    JAI, Oxford, United Kingdom
 
  The idea of designing affordable equipment and developing sustainable infrastructures for delivering radiation treatment for patients with cancer in countries that lack resources and expertise stimulated a first International Cancer Expert Corps (ICEC) championed, CERN-hosted workshop in Geneva in November 2016. Which has since been followed by three additional workshops involving the sponsorship and support from UK Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC). One of the major challenges in meeting this need to deliver radiotherapy in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) is to design a linear accelerator and associated instrumentation system which can be operated in locations where general infrastructures and qualified human resources are poor or lacking, power outages and water supply fluctuations can occur frequently and where climatic conditions might be harsh and challenging. In parallel it is essential to address education, training and mentoring requirements for current, as well as future novel radiation therapy treatment (RTT) systems.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2019-THPMP038  
About • paper received ※ 11 May 2019       paper accepted ※ 22 May 2019       issue date ※ 21 June 2019  
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