Author: Harden, F.J.
Paper Title Page
MOPTS091 Mechanical Robustness of HL-LHC Collimator Designs 1070
 
  • F. Carra, A. Bertarelli, G. Gobbi, J. Guardia, M. Guinchard, F.J. Harden, M. Pasquali, S. Redaelli, E. Skordis
    CERN, Meyrin, Switzerland
 
  Funding: This work has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation programme under Grant Agreement No. 730871. Research supported by the HL-LHC project.
Two new absorbing materials were developed as collimator inserts to fulfil the requirements of HL-LHC higher brightness beams: molybdenum-carbide graphite (MoGr) and copper-diamond (CuCD). These materials were tested under intense beam impacts at CERN HiRadMat facility in 2015, when full jaw prototypes were irradiated. Additional tests in HiRadMat were performed in 2017 on another series of material samples, including also improved grades of MoGr and CuCD, and different coating solutions. This paper summarizes the main results of the two experiments, with a main focus on the behaviour of the novel composite blocks, the metallic housing, as well as the cooling circuit. The experimental campaign confirmed the final choice for the materials and the design solutions for HL-LHC collimators, and constituted a unique chance of benchmarking numerical models. In particular, the tests validated the selection of MoGr for primary and secondary collimators, and CuCD as a valid solution for robust tertiary collimators.
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2019-MOPTS091  
About • paper received ※ 12 April 2019       paper accepted ※ 20 May 2019       issue date ※ 21 June 2019  
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THPRB083 Detailed Analysis Of The Baseline Dose Levels And Localized Radiation Spikes In The Arc Sections Of The Large Hadron Collider During Run 2 4009
 
  • K. Bilko, M. Brugger, R. Garcia Alia, F.J. Harden, Y. Kadi, O. Stein
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
 
  The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has eight insertion regions (IRs) which house the large experiments or accelerator equipment. These IRs are interconnected with the arc sections consisting of a periodic magnet structure. During the operation of the LHC small amounts of the beam particles are lost, creating prompt radiation fields in the accelerator tunnels and the adjacent caverns. One of the main loss mechanisms in the LHC arc sections is the interaction of the beam particles with the residual gas molecules. The analysis of the dose levels based on the beam loss measurement data shows that the majority of the measurements have similar levels, which allow to define baseline values for each arc section. The baseline levels decreased during the years 2015, 2016 and stabilised in 2017 and 2018 at annual dose levels below 50 mGy, which can be correlated with the residual gas densities in the LHC arcs. In some location of the arcs radiation spikes exceed the base line by more than two orders of magnitude. In addition to the analysis of these dose levels, a novel approach of identifying local dose maxima and the main driving mechanisms creating these radiation spikes will be presented.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2019-THPRB083  
About • paper received ※ 14 May 2019       paper accepted ※ 23 May 2019       issue date ※ 21 June 2019  
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THPRB084 Run 2 Prompt Dose Distribution and Evolution at the Large Hadron Collider and Implications for Future Accelerator Operation 4013
 
  • O. Stein, K. Bilko, M. Brugger, R. Garcia Alia, F.J. Harden, Y. Kadi, A. Lechner, G. Lerner
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
 
  During the operation of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) small fractions of beam particles are lost, creating prompt radiation fields in the accelerator tunnels. Exposed electronics and accelerator components show lifetime degradation and stochastic Single Event Effects (SEEs) which can lead to faults and downtime of the LHC. Close to the experiments the radiation levels scale nicely with the integrated luminosity since the luminosity debris is the major contributor for creating the radiation fields in this area of the LHC. In the collimation regions it was expected that the radiation fields scale with the integrated beam intensities since the beams are continuously cleaned from particles which exceed the accelerator’s acceptance. The analysis of radiation data shows that the dose measurements in the collimation regions normalised with the integrated beam intensities for 2016 and 2017 are comparable. Against expectations, the intensity normalised radiation datasets of 2018 in these regions differ significantly from the previous years. Especially in the betatron collimation region the radiation levels are up to a factor 3 higher. The radiation levels in the collimation regions correlate with the levelling of beta-star and the crossing angle in the high luminosity experiments ATLAS and CMS. These increased normalised doses have direct implications on the expected dose levels during future LHC operation, including the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) upgrade.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2019-THPRB084  
About • paper received ※ 14 May 2019       paper accepted ※ 23 May 2019       issue date ※ 21 June 2019  
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THPRB085 HiRadMat: A Facility Beyond the Realms of Materials Testing 4016
 
  • F.J. Harden, A. Bouvard, N. Charitonidis, Y. Kadi
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
 
  The ever-expanding requirements of high-power targets and accelerator equipment has highlighted the need for facilities capable of accommodating experiments with a diverse range of objectives. HiRadMat, a High Radiation to Materials testing facility at CERN has, throughout operation, established itself as a global user facility capable of going beyond its initial design goals. Pulsed high energy, high intensity, proton beams have been delivered to experiments ranging from materials testing, detector’s prototype validation, radiation to electronics assessment and beam instrumentation. A 440 GeV/c proton beam is provided directly from the CERN SPS. Up to 288 bunches/pulse at a maximum pulse intensity of 3.5 x 1013 protons/pulse can be delivered. Through collaborative efforts, HiRadMat has developed into a state-of-the-art facility with improved in situ measurement routines, beam diagnostic systems and data acquisition techniques, offered to all users. This contribution summarises the recent experimental achievements, highlights previous facility enhancements and discusses potential future upgrades with particular focus on HiRadMat as a facility open to novel experiments.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2019-THPRB085  
About • paper received ※ 29 April 2019       paper accepted ※ 23 May 2019       issue date ※ 21 June 2019  
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THPRB086 Design & Optimization of the Alignment Supports for the New Laminated Magnets for the CERN East Area Consolidation Project 4020
 
  • R. Vanhoutte, D. Brethoux, A. Ebn Rahmoun, S. Evrard, F.J. Harden, E. Harrouch, M. Lazzaroni, M. Lino Diogo dos Santos, R. Lopez, D.E. Nogtikov, J. Renedo Anglada
    CERN, Meyrin, Switzerland
 
  The East Area is one of CERNs experimental area, running since its foundation in 1958. Extracting a 24GeV proton beam from the Proton Synchrotron accelerator, the primary beam is divided into different secondary beams, serving various experiments and user’s facilities such as CLOUD, CHARM, IRRAD. Due to improved optics and an energy saving scheme, the facility will go under a renovation between 2019 and 2020, including the replacement of the magnets with new laminated ones to allow a cycled powering scheme. Those magnets need improved supports, and in some cases even a new design, to optimize the alignment operations in those areas. This article will mainly address the different proposed solutions for plug-in supports as well as for conventional ones.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2019-THPRB086  
About • paper received ※ 15 May 2019       paper accepted ※ 23 May 2019       issue date ※ 21 June 2019  
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THPRB087 Study of the Energy Savings Resulting from the East Area Renovation 4023
 
  • B. LM. Lamaille, F. Dragoni, S. Evrard, F.J. Harden, E. Harrouch, M. Lazzaroni, R. Lopez, K.D. Papastergiou
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
 
  CERN’s East Experimental Area, situated on the Swiss side of the Meyrin site, with its four beamlines, has served physics for more than 40 years. As the building and equipment are reaching their end of life, a thorough consolidation project has been initiated in order to pro-vide many more years of reliable operation. This article addresses the different proposed solutions to reduce significantly the energy consumption of the East Area. It outlines the methodology applied to estimate as precisely as possible the future attained energy savings, which will result in an estimated reduction of approximately 80% in electricity usage (from 11 GWh to 2 GWh per year) and of approximately 65% in gas usage for heating purpose (from 3 GWh to 1 GWh per year).  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2019-THPRB087  
About • paper received ※ 15 May 2019       paper accepted ※ 23 May 2019       issue date ※ 21 June 2019  
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