MC8: Applications of Accelerators, Technology Transfer and Industrial Relations
U01 Medical Applications
Paper Title Page
THXPLS1 Review of Ion Therapy Machine and Future Perspective 3391
 
  • K. Noda
    NIRS, Chiba-shi, Japan
 
  Cancer therapy with ion beams presents several advantages as compared to proton therapy or conventional radiation therapy but its diffusion is limited by the size and cost of the accelerator facility. The ion therapy facilities are presently in operation have generated important developments in particular to the gantry, beam delivery technique, and beam scanning system, while new treatment facilities being planned in United States, Europe, and Asia. This talk will present the current status of this field, as well as the future perspective.  
slides icon Slides THXPLS1 [26.303 MB]  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2019-THXPLS1  
About • paper received ※ 13 May 2019       paper accepted ※ 21 May 2019       issue date ※ 21 June 2019  
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THXXPLS1 Status of the Carbon Commissioning and Roadmap Projects of the MedAustron Ion Therapy Center Accelerator 3404
 
  • M.T.F. Pivi, L. Adler, A. De Franco, F. Farinon, N. Gambino, G. Guidoboni, G. Kowarik, M. Kronberger, C. Kurfürst, H.T. Lau, S. Myalski, S. Nowak, C. Schmitzer, I. Strašík, P. Urschütz, A. Wastl
    EBG MedAustron, Wr. Neustadt, Austria
  • L.C. Penescu
    Abstract Landscapes, Montpellier, France
 
  The synchrotron-based MedAustron Particle Therapy Accelerator MAPTA located in Austria, delivers proton beams for medical treatment in the energy range 62-252 MeV/n since the year 2016 and is in preparation to provide C6+ carbon ions in the range 120-400 MeV/n to two of the three clinically used ion therapy irradiation rooms. In addition, carbon and proton beams, the latter with up to 800 MeV, will be provided to a fourth room dedicated to research. After beam generation and pre-acceleration to 7MeV, a 77m long synchrotron accelerates particles up to the requested energy for clinical treatment. A third-order resonance extraction method is used to extract the particles from the synchrotron in a slow controlled process and then transfer the particles to the 4 irradiation rooms with a spill time of 0.1-10 seconds to facilitate the control of the delivered radiation dose during clinical treatments. Presently, proton beams are delivered to the horizontal and vertical beam lines of three rooms. Commissioning of the accelerator with carbon ions has been completed for one beam line. In parallel, the installation of the beam line magnets for the proton Gantry is ongoing. A review of the accelerator and the status of the carbon commissioning, ongoing in parallel with clinical operations, and an outlook to future roadmap projects are presented.  
slides icon Slides THXXPLS1 [17.863 MB]  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2019-THXXPLS1  
About • paper received ※ 19 May 2019       paper accepted ※ 24 May 2019       issue date ※ 21 June 2019  
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THXXPLS2
Recent Progress in the Production of Medical Radioisotopes with RFT-30 Cyclotron  
 
  • E.J. Lee, M.G. Hur, Y.B. Kong, J.H. Park, H.S. Song, S.D. Yang
    KAERI, Daejon, Republic of Korea
 
  RFT-30 cyclotron has been regularly operated since 2013, and research on the production of radioisotopes (RIs) has been performed using this cyclotron. Fluorine-18 (F-18), which is the most widely-used positron emitter, has been regularly produced and provided to users in universities and research institutes since 2015. In 2018, mass-production of zirconium-89 (Zr-89) is successfully achieved. Zr-89 has a half-life of 3.3 days which is well matched to the circulation half-lives of antibodies. In addition, long-term proton irradiation for the production of germanium-68 (Ge-68), which is one of the typical generator RIs, was also carried out. A generator is a device used to extract the positron-emitting daughter radioisotope from a source of the decaying parent radioisotope which has a relatively long half-life. Furthermore, we are trying to optimize irradiation conditions for the RI production and following processes after the irradiation. The research on the production of other useful RIs and the performance improvement for the mass-production will be accomplished in the future.  
slides icon Slides THXXPLS2 [7.226 MB]  
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THPMP002 Optics Design and Beam Dynamics Simulation for a VHEE Radiobiology Beam Line at PRAE Accelerator 3444
 
  • A. Faus-Golfe, B. Bai, Y. Han, C. Vallerand
    LAL, Orsay, France
  • R. Delorme, Y. Prezado
    IMNC, Orsay, France
  • M. Dosanjh
    CERN, Meyrin, Switzerland
  • P. Duchesne
    IPN, Orsay, France
  • V. Favaudon, C. Fouillade, P.M. Poortmans, F. Pouzoulet
    Institut Curie - Centre de Protonthérapie d’Orsay, Orsay, France
 
  The Platform for Research and Applications with Electrons (PRAE) is a multidisciplinary R&D facility gathering subatomic physics, instrumentation, radiobiology and clinical research around a high-performance electron accelerator with beam energies up to 70 MeV. In this paper we report the complete optics design and performance evaluation of a Very High Energy Electron (VHEE) innovative radiobiology study, in particular by using Grid mini-beam and FLASH methodologies, which could represent a major breakthrough in Radiation Therapy (RT) treatment modality.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2019-THPMP002  
About • paper received ※ 27 April 2019       paper accepted ※ 22 May 2019       issue date ※ 21 June 2019  
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THPMP010 Implementation of RF-KO Extraction at CNAO 3469
 
  • S. Savazzi, E. Bressi, G. Debernardi, L. Falbo, V. Lante, C. Priano, M. G. Pullia
    CNAO Foundation, Pavia, Italy
  • P. Meliga
    University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy
  • G. Russo
    Politecnico di Torino, Torino, Italy
 
  The National Centre for Oncological Hadrontherapy (CNAO) is a synchrotron based particle therapy facility. Both protons and carbon ions can be used for treatments. The main extraction system is based on ’amplitude-momentum selection’ driven by a betatron core, but RF-KO (Radio-Frequency Knock Out) is being implemented as an alternative extraction scheme, being more suitable for a future implementation of a ’multi energy extraction’ operation of the accelerator. With a double extraction possibility, CNAO would allow an interesting theoretical and experimental evaluation of the relative merits of the two extraction schemes. The RF deflector is already installed and the RF power generation is under commissioning. Extraction simulations and first results of the system are presented.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2019-THPMP010  
About • paper received ※ 15 May 2019       paper accepted ※ 20 May 2019       issue date ※ 21 June 2019  
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THPMP011 Optics and Commissioning of the CNAO Experimental Beam Line 3472
 
  • S. Savazzi, E. Bressi, L. Falbo, V. Lante, C. Priano, M. G. Pullia
    CNAO Foundation, Pavia, Italy
  • P. Meliga
    University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy
 
  CNAO (National Centre for Oncological Hadronthera-py) in Pavia is one of the six centres worldwide in which hadrontherapy is administered with both protons and carbon ions. The main accelerator is a 25 m diameter synchrotron designed to accelerate carbon ions up to an energy of 400 MeV/u and protons up to an energy of 250 MeV. It was designed with three treatment rooms and an ’experimental room’ where research can be carried out. The room itself was built since the beginning, but the beam line was planned to be installed in a second moment in order to give priority to treatments. The beam line of the experimental room (XPR) is designed to be "general purpose", for research activities in different fields. In October 2018 the installation phase of the line was started and it ended in January 2019. In this paper a short description of the optics layout and commissioning strategy is given.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2019-THPMP011  
About • paper received ※ 15 May 2019       paper accepted ※ 22 May 2019       issue date ※ 21 June 2019  
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THPMP014 2D TRACKING CODE FOR DRIFT TUBE LINAC 3482
 
  • A. Yamaguchi, K. Nakayama, K. Okaya, K. Sato
    Toshiba, Yokohama, Japan
  • N. Hayashizaki
    RLNR, Tokyo, Japan
  • Y. Iwata, S. Yamada
    NIRS, Chiba-shi, Japan
  • T. Takeuchi
    Toshiba Energy Systems & Solutions Corporation, Keihin Product Operations, Yokohama, Japan
 
  A 2D tracking code has been developed for Alternating-Phase-Focusing drift tube linacs (APF-DTL). This code can design DTLs with a 2D electric field simulation and particle tracking by approximate equations. In this paper, we describe an outline of the 2D tracking code and a comparison of 2D tracking results and 3D simulation.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2019-THPMP014  
About • paper received ※ 15 May 2019       paper accepted ※ 22 May 2019       issue date ※ 21 June 2019  
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THPMP017 Design and Development of the Beamline System for a Proton Therapy Facility 3488
 
  • B. Qin, Q.S. Chen, M. Fan, K.F. Liu, X. Liu, J. Yang, Z.F. Zhao
    HUST, Wuhan, People’s Republic of China
  • W.J. Han, D. Li, Z.K. Liang
    Huazhong University of Science and Technology, State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology,, Hubei, People’s Republic of China
 
  Funding: This work was supported by The National Key Research and Development Program of China, with grant No. 2016YFC0105305; and by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11375068).
A proton therapy facility with multiple treatment rooms based on superconducting cyclotron scheme is under development in HUST (Huazhong University of Science and Technology). Design features and overview of development progress for the beamline system will be presented in this paper, which mainly focuses on prototype beamline magnets, a kicker magnet for fast beam switch, and the gantry beamline using image optics.
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2019-THPMP017  
About • paper received ※ 29 April 2019       paper accepted ※ 21 May 2019       issue date ※ 21 June 2019  
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THPMP029 Design Study of a Compact Superconducting Cyclotron SC240 for Proton Therapy 3506
 
  • F. Jiang, G. Chen, Y. Chen, K.Z. Ding, J. Li, Y. Song, Z. Wu, J. Zhou
    ASIPP, Hefei, People’s Republic of China
  • Z. Zhong
    HFCIM, HeFei, People’s Republic of China
 
  Funding: National Natural Science Foundation of China under grant No. 11775258 & 11575237; International Scientific and Technological Co-operation Project of Anhui (grant No. 1704e1002207).
A compact AVF cyclotron of 240 MeV is under-designed for proton therapy. In order to reduce the size, the weight and operation cost, two superconducting coils are designed to implement the 2.35T central field. And the magnet weight is about 90 tons. The constant gap between the sectors is considered without deteriorating the beam stability. A dedicated design on extraction zone is performed to make the average field to close the isochronous field. The extraction efficiency is expected higher than 80%, by regulating the 1st harmonic field and arranging the extraction elements properly. In order to avoid the large scale of volume helium explosion in the quench, the low temperature superconducting coil using NbTi/Cu wire is cooled by 4K GM Cryocooler in a helium volume limiting design. The paper will present the physical design of this cyclotron.
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2019-THPMP029  
About • paper received ※ 17 May 2019       paper accepted ※ 22 May 2019       issue date ※ 21 June 2019  
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THPMP033 Beam Characterisation Using MEDIPIX3 and EBT3 Film at the Clatterbridge Proton Therapy Beamline 3510
SUSPFO110   use link to see paper's listing under its alternate paper code  
 
  • J.S.L. Yap, J. Resta-López, R. Schnuerer, C.P. Welsch
    Cockcroft Institute, Warrington, Cheshire, United Kingdom
  • N.J.S. Bal
    ASI, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
  • N.J.S. Bal, M. Fransen, F. Linde
    NIKHEF, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
  • A. Kacperek
    The Douglas Cyclotron, The Clatterbridge Cancer Centre NHS Foundation Trust, Wirral, United Kingdom
  • J.L. Parsons
    Cancer Research Centre, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom
  • J. Resta-López, R. Schnuerer, C.P. Welsch
    The University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom
 
  Funding: EU FP7 grant agreement 215080, H2020 Marie Skłodowska-Curie grant agreement No 675265 - Optimization of Medical Accelerators (OMA) project and the Cockcroft Institute core grant STGA00076-01.
The Clatterbridge Cancer Centre (CCC) in the UK is a particle therapy facility providing treatment for ocular cancers using a 60 MeV passively scattered proton therapy beam. A model of the beamline using the Monte Carlo Simulation toolkit Geant4 has been developed for accurate characterisation of the beam. In order to validate the simulation, a study of the beam profiles along the delivery system is necessary. Beam profile measurements have been performed at multiple positions in the CCC beam line using both EBT3 GAFchromic film and Medipix3, a single quantum counting chip developed specifically for medical applications, typically used for x-ray detection. This is the first time its performance has been tested within a clinical, high proton flux environment. EBT3 is the current standard for conventional radiotherapy film dosimetry and was used to determine the dose and for correlation to fluence measured by Medipix3. The count rate linearity and doses recorded with Medipix3 were evaluated across the full range of available beam intensities, up to 3.12 x 1010 protons/s. The applicability of Medipix3 for proton therapy dosimetry is discussed and compared against the performance of EBT3.
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2019-THPMP033  
About • paper received ※ 14 May 2019       paper accepted ※ 22 May 2019       issue date ※ 21 June 2019  
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THPMP038 Collaborative Strategies for Meeting the Global Need for Cancer Radiation Therapy Treatment Systems 3526
 
  • M. Dosanjh, P. Collier, I. Syratchev, W. Wuensch
    CERN, Meyrin, Switzerland
  • A. Aggarwal
    KCL, London, United Kingdom
  • D. Angal-Kalinin, P.A. McIntosh, B.L. Militsyn
    STFC/DL/ASTeC, Daresbury, Warrington, Cheshire, United Kingdom
  • R. Apsimon
    Cockcroft Institute, Lancaster University, Lancaster, United Kingdom
  • S.T. Boogert
    Royal Holloway, University of London, Surrey, United Kingdom
  • G. Burt
    Lancaster University, Lancaster, United Kingdom
  • N. Coleman, D.A. Pistenmaa
    ICEC, Washington, DC, USA
  • A.W. Cross
    USTRAT/SUPA, Glasgow, United Kingdom
  • I.V. Konoplev, S.L. Sheehy
    JAI, Oxford, United Kingdom
 
  The idea of designing affordable equipment and developing sustainable infrastructures for delivering radiation treatment for patients with cancer in countries that lack resources and expertise stimulated a first International Cancer Expert Corps (ICEC) championed, CERN-hosted workshop in Geneva in November 2016. Which has since been followed by three additional workshops involving the sponsorship and support from UK Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC). One of the major challenges in meeting this need to deliver radiotherapy in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) is to design a linear accelerator and associated instrumentation system which can be operated in locations where general infrastructures and qualified human resources are poor or lacking, power outages and water supply fluctuations can occur frequently and where climatic conditions might be harsh and challenging. In parallel it is essential to address education, training and mentoring requirements for current, as well as future novel radiation therapy treatment (RTT) systems.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2019-THPMP038  
About • paper received ※ 11 May 2019       paper accepted ※ 22 May 2019       issue date ※ 21 June 2019  
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THPMP039 How Robust Are Existing Medical Linacs in Challenging Environments? A Study of Down Time and Failure Causes. 3530
 
  • S.L. Sheehy, L. Wroe
    JAI, Oxford, United Kingdom
  • A.J. Egerton
    Egerton Consulting Ltd, Minety, Malmesbury, Wiltshire, United Kingdom
  • A. Steinberg
    Oxford University, Physics Department, Oxford, Oxon, United Kingdom
 
  There is a severe lack of radiotherapy linear accelerators (LINACs) in Low- and Middle-Income countries (LMICs), limiting capacity for cancer care in these regions. Anecdotally, operating high tech accelerators in environments with power fluctuations, harsh climatic conditions and geographic isolation leads to large failure rates and downtime. To guide future developments, this study presents a data-driven approach to collect statistical data on LINAC downtime and failure modes, comparing to a simple availability model.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2019-THPMP039  
About • paper received ※ 15 May 2019       paper accepted ※ 22 May 2019       issue date ※ 21 June 2019  
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THPMP041 A Comparative Study of Biological Effects of Electrons and Co-60 Gamma Rays on pBR322 Plasmid DNA 3533
SUSPFO119   use link to see paper's listing under its alternate paper code  
 
  • K.L. Small, R.M. Jones
    UMAN, Manchester, United Kingdom
  • D. Angal-Kalinin, M. Surman
    Cockcroft Institute, Warrington, Cheshire, United Kingdom
  • A. Chadwick, N.T. Henthorn, K. Kirkby, M.J. Merchant, R. Morris, E. Santina
    The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, United Kingdom
  • R. Edge
    Dalton Cumbrian Facility, University of Manchester, Cumbria, United Kingdom
  • R.J. Smith
    STFC/DL/ASTeC, Daresbury, Warrington, Cheshire, United Kingdom
 
  Very High-Energy Electron (VHEE) therapy is a rapidly developing field motivated by developments in high-gradient linacs. Advantages include sufficient penetration (>30 cm) for treatment of deep-seated tumours, measured insensitivity to inhomogeneities and rapid delivery time, making VHEE viable for treatment of heterogeneous regions, e.g. lung or bowel. Researchers at the University of Manchester and CERN have routinely produced accelerating gradients of ~100 MeV/m for the CLIC project. Suitable modification can result in a high gradient medical linac producing 250 MeV electrons within a treatment room. Radiobiological research for VHEE is vital to understand its use in radiotherapy and how it compares with conventional modalities. The goal of radiotherapy is to destroy tumour cells while sparing healthy cells, primarily by damaging DNA within the cancer cell. The study aim is to understand the fundamental interactions between VHEE and biological structures through plasmid irradiation studies - both computational, using the Monte Carlo GEANT4-DNA code, and experimental. Plasmid irradiation experiments have been carried out at using Co-60 gammas at the Dalton Cumbrian Facility and using 6-15 MeV electrons at the Christie NHS Foundation Trust to determine the type and quantity of damage caused to DNA by electron irradiation. These experiments are a world first in VHEE radiobiology, with further studies planned at higher energies using the CLARA and CLEAR facilities at Daresbury and CERN. These studies will also consider the effective dose range of VHEE with energy, as well as implications of damage on DNA. Research into this area of radiotherapy can provide a valuable addition to tools currently available to physicians in the fight against cancer.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2019-THPMP041  
About • paper received ※ 15 May 2019       paper accepted ※ 22 May 2019       issue date ※ 21 June 2019  
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THPMP042 Performance Optimization of Ion Beam Therapy 3537
 
  • C.P. Welsch
    Cockcroft Institute, Warrington, Cheshire, United Kingdom
  • C.P. Welsch
    The University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom
 
  Funding: This project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie SkłodowskaCurie grant agreement No 675265.
Proton beam therapy promises significant advantages over other forms of radiation therapy. However, to assure the best possible cancer care for patients further R&D into novel beam imaging and patient diagnostics, enhanced biological and physical models in Monte Carlo codes, as well as clinical facility design and optimization is required. Within the pan-European Optimization of Medical Accelerators (OMA) project collaborative research is being carried out between universities, research and clinical facilities, and industry in all of these areas. This contribution presents results from studies into low-intensity proton beam diagnostics, prompt gamma-based range verification in proton therapy, as well as prospects for a new proton irradiation facility for radiobiological measurements at an 18 MeV cyclotron within OMA. These results are then connected to the wider project aims of enhancing ion beam therapy. A summary of past and future events organised by the OMA consortium is also given.
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2019-THPMP042  
About • paper received ※ 10 May 2019       paper accepted ※ 23 May 2019       issue date ※ 21 June 2019  
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THPMP043 Non-Invasive Beam Monitoring Using LHCb VELO With 40 MeV Protons 3541
 
  • R. Schnuerer, C.P. Welsch, J.S.L. Yap, H.D. Zhang
    Cockcroft Institute, Warrington, Cheshire, United Kingdom
  • T. Price
    Birmingham University, Birmingham, United Kingdom
  • R. Schnuerer, C.P. Welsch, J.S.L. Yap, H.D. Zhang
    The University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom
  • T. Szumlak
    AGH, Cracow, Poland
 
  Funding: EU grant agreements 215080 and 675265, the Cockcroft Institute core Grant (ST/G008248/1), national agency: MNiSW and NCN (UMO-2015/17/B/ST2/02904) and the Grand Challenge Network+ (EP/N027167/1).
In proton beam therapy, knowledge of the detailed beam properties is essential to ensure effective dose delivery to the patient. In clinical practice, currently used interceptive ionisation chambers require daily calibration and suffer from slow response time. This contribution presents a new non-invasive method for dose online monitoring. It is based on the silicon multi-strip sensor LHCb VELO (VErtex LOcator), developed originally for the LHCb experiment at CERN. The semi-circular detector geometry offers the possibility to measure beam intensity through halo measurements without interfering with the beam core. Results from initial tests using this monitor in the 40 MeV proton beamline at the University of Birmingham, UK are shown. Synchronised with an ionisation chamber and the RF cyclotron frequency, VELO was used as online monitor by measuring the intensity in the proton beam halo and using this information as basis for 3D beam profiles. Experimental results are discussed.
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2019-THPMP043  
About • paper received ※ 15 May 2019       paper accepted ※ 23 May 2019       issue date ※ 21 June 2019  
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THPMP050 Progress on the Optics Modeling of BMI’s Ion Rapid-Cycling Medical Synchrotron at BNL 3561
 
  • F. Méot, P.N. Joshi, N. Tsoupas
    BNL, Upton, Long Island, New York, USA
  • J.P. Lidestri
    Best Medical International, Springfield, USA
 
  Funding: A project funded by Best Medical International, in the framework of a Technical Services Agreement (No. TSA-NF-18-50) with Brookhaven National Laboratory.
The Brookhaven National Laboratory continues to provide technical support and guidance to Best Medical International to build and test a 60 degree magnetic arc of a rapid-cycling ion synchrotron for cancer treatment. The 60 degree magnetic sector on its guirder has undergone field measurements, including the production of partial 3D field maps. Concurrently, OPERA field map computations as well as lattice and beam dynamics simulations have been performed, aimed at both preparing and analyzing the field measurements. Contingency responses aimed at adapting to non-ideal orbit and optics have been devised. These works and their outcomes are summarized here.
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2019-THPMP050  
About • paper received ※ 14 May 2019       paper accepted ※ 22 May 2019       issue date ※ 21 June 2019  
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THPMP051 Development of 211-Astatine Production in the Crocker Nuclear Laboratory Cyclotron 3564
 
  • E. Prebys
    Fermilab, Batavia, Illinois, USA
  • R.J. Abergel
    UCB, Berkeley, California, USA
  • W.H. Casey
    University of California at Davis (UC Davis), Davis, California, USA
  • D.A. Cebra
    UCD, Davis, California, USA
 
  There is a great deal of interest in the medical community in the use of the alpha-emitter 211-At as a therapeutic isotope. Among other things, its 7.2 hour half life is long enough to allow for recovery and labeling, but short enough to avoid long term activity in patients. Unfortunately, the only practical technique for its production is to bombard a 209-Bi target with a ~29 MeV alpha beam, so it is not accessible to commercial isotope production facilities, which all use fixed energy proton beams. The US Department of Energy is therefore supporting the development of a "University Isotope Network" (UIN) to satisfy this need. Our prposoal is to retrofit the variable-energy, multi-species cyclotron at the Crocker Nuclear Laboratory at the University of California Davis with an internal Bi-209 target, such that we can put at least 100 uA of 29 MeV alpha particles on target without concerns about extraction efficiency. Using very conservative assumptions, we are confident we will be able to produce 60 mCi of 211-At in solution in an eight hour shift, which includes setup, exposure, and chemical recovery. This poster will cover the design of the target, as well as the required chemical processing and reliability upgrades.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2019-THPMP051  
About • paper received ※ 15 May 2019       paper accepted ※ 22 May 2019       issue date ※ 21 June 2019  
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THPMP052 Recent Progress in R&D for Ionetix Ion-12SC Superconducting Cyclotron for Production of Medical Isotopes 3568
 
  • X. Wu, G.F. Blosser, G.S. Horner, Z.S. Neville, J.M. Paquette, N.R. Usher, J.J. Vincent
    Ionetix, Lansing, Michigan, USA
  • D.M. Alt
    NSCL, East Lansing, Michigan, USA
 
  The Ion-12SC is a sub-compact, 12.5 MeV proton su-perconducting isochronous cyclotron for commercial medical isotope production recently developed at Ionetix Corporation [1]. The machine features a patented cold steel and cryogen-free conduction cooling magnet, a low power internal cold-cathode PIG ion source, and an inter-nal liquid target [2]. It was initially designed to produce N-13 ammonia for dose on-demand cardiology applica-tions but can also be used to produce F-18, Ga-68 and other medical isotopes widely used in Positron Emission Tomography (PET). The 1st engineering prototype was completed and commissioned in September 2015, and four additional units have been completed since [3]. The first two units have been installed and operated at the University of Michigan and MIT. R&D efforts in physics and engineering have continued to improve machine performance, stability and reliability. These improve-ments include: 1) Water cooling added to the dummy dee to limit the operating temperature of the ion source to improve lifetime and performance, 2) Magnetic field maps, obtained with a Hall probe based mapper, were used to accurately measure the isochronism and provide information needed to compensate for any unwanted 1st harmonics and 3) Feedback based control methods ap-plied to regulate the beam intensity on target by adjusting the ion source cathode current. The C1 unit installed at the University of Michigan Medical School early this year treated ~100 patients/month with N-13 ammonia. The machines are now capable of routinely producing > 21 doses/day with > 99% availability. The Ionetix manu-facturing facility is capable of producing up to 30 ma-chines per year.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2019-THPMP052  
About • paper received ※ 14 May 2019       paper accepted ※ 22 May 2019       issue date ※ 21 June 2019  
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THPMP054 Superconducting Dipole Design for a Proton Computed Tomography Gantry 3574
 
  • E. Oponowicz, H.L. Owen
    UMAN, Manchester, United Kingdom
 
  Funding: This project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the MSC grant agreement No 675265, OMA - Optimization of Medical Accelerators.
Proton computed tomography aims to increase the accuracy of proton treatment planning by directly measuring proton stopping power. This imaging technique requires a proton beam of 330 MeV incident kinetic energy for adult patients. Employing superconducting technology in the beam delivery system allows it to be of comparable size to a conventional proton therapy gantry. A superconducting bending magnet design for a proton computed tomography gantry is proposed in this paper. The 30 deg, 3.9 T canted-cosine-theta dipole wound with NbTi wires is used to steer 330 MeV protons in an isocentric beam delivery system which rotates around the patient. Two methods of magnetic field shielding are compared in the context of proton therapy facility requirements; traditional passive shielding with an iron yoke placed around the magnet and an active shielding option utilising extra layers of the superconducting coil.
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2019-THPMP054  
About • paper received ※ 15 May 2019       paper accepted ※ 23 May 2019       issue date ※ 21 June 2019  
Export • reference for this paper using ※ BibTeX, ※ LaTeX, ※ Text/Word, ※ RIS, ※ EndNote (xml)