Author: Litvinenko, V.
Paper Title Page
MOZPLS2 Ion Collider Precision Measurements With Different Species 28
 
  • G.J. Marr, E.N. Beebe, I. Blackler, W. Christie, K.A. Drees, P.S. Dyer, A.V. Fedotov, W. Fischer, C.J. Gardner, H. Huang, T. Kanesue, N.A. Kling, V. Litvinenko, C. Liu, Y. Luo, D. Maffei, B. Martin, A. Marusic, K. Mernick, M.G. Minty, C. Naylor, M. Okamura, I. Pinayev, G. Robert-Demolaize, T. Roser, P. Sampson, V. Schoefer, T.C. Shrey, D. Steski, P. Thieberger, J.E. Tuozzolo, K. Zeno, I.Y. Zhang
    BNL, Upton, Long Island, New York, USA
 
  Funding: Work supported by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886 with the U.S. Department of Energy.
Precedent to electron cooling commissioning and collisions of Gold at various energies at RHIC in 2018, the STAR experiment desired an exploration of the chiral magnetic effect in the quark gluon plasma (QGP) with an isobar run, utilizing Ruthenium and Zirconium. Colliding Zr-96 with Zr-96 and Ru-96 with Ru-96 create the same QGP but in a different magnetic field due to the different charges of the Zr (Z=40) and Ru (Z=44) ions. Since the charge difference is only 10%, the experimental program requires exacting store conditions for both ions. These systematic error concerns presented new challenges for the Collider, including frequent reconfiguration of the Collider for the different ion species, and maintaining level amounts of instantaneous and integrated luminosity between two species. Moreover, making beams of Zr-96 and Ru-96 is challenging since the natural abundances of these isotopes are low. Creating viable enriched source material for Zr-96 required assistance processing from RIKEN, while Ru-96 was provided by a new enrichment facility under commissioning at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.
 
slides icon Slides MOZPLS2 [4.758 MB]  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2019-MOZPLS2  
About • paper received ※ 11 May 2019       paper accepted ※ 20 May 2019       issue date ※ 21 June 2019  
Export • reference for this paper using ※ BibTeX, ※ LaTeX, ※ Text/Word, ※ RIS, ※ EndNote (xml)  
 
MOPGW111 Start to End Simulation on Beam Dynamics in Coherent Electron Cooling Accelerator 379
 
  • Y.C. Jing, V. Litvinenko, I. Petrushina, I. Pinayev, K. Shih, Y.H. Wu
    BNL, Upton, Long Island, New York, USA
  • V. Litvinenko
    Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, USA
  • I. Petrushina
    SUNY SB, Stony Brook, New York, USA
  • K. Shih
    SBU, Stony Brook, New York, USA
 
  Funding: Work supported by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886 with the U.S. Department of Energy.
A Coherent electron Cooling (CeC) has a potential of substantial reducing cooling time of the high-energy hadrons and hence to boost luminosity in high-intensity hadron-hadron and electron-hadron colliders. In a CeC system, a high quality electron beam is generated, propagated and optimized through a beam line which was carefully designed with consideration of space charge effect, wakefields and nonlinear dynamics such as coherent synchrotron radiation and chromatic aberration. In this paper, we present our study on the beam dynamics of such a beam line and compare the simulation result with what was measured in experiment.
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2019-MOPGW111  
About • paper received ※ 17 May 2019       paper accepted ※ 20 May 2019       issue date ※ 21 June 2019  
Export • reference for this paper using ※ BibTeX, ※ LaTeX, ※ Text/Word, ※ RIS, ※ EndNote (xml)  
 
MOPGW112 Design of a Bunch Compressor with CSR Suppression to Achieve Hundreds of kA Peak Current 382
 
  • Y.C. Jing, V. Litvinenko
    BNL, Upton, Long Island, New York, USA
  • V. Litvinenko
    Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, USA
 
  Funding: Work supported by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886 with the U.S. Department of Energy.
A four dipole magnetic chicane is usually used to compress electron bunch to very short in modern accelerators which requires electron beams to have high peak current. The coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) originated from the strong bending magnets in the chicane could greatly degrade the quality of the electron beam. In this paper, we present our design for a bunch compressing system with 30 to 100 fold in bunch length reduction and at the mean time suppress the effect of CSR on the e-beam’s quality. We discuss and detail the performance of such a compressor for potential FACET-II upgrade.
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2019-MOPGW112  
About • paper received ※ 15 May 2019       paper accepted ※ 20 May 2019       issue date ※ 21 June 2019  
Export • reference for this paper using ※ BibTeX, ※ LaTeX, ※ Text/Word, ※ RIS, ※ EndNote (xml)  
 
MOPMP050 Performance of CeC PoP Accelerator 559
 
  • I. Pinayev, Z. Altinbas, J.C. Brutus, A.J. Curcio, A. Di Lieto, T. Hayes, R.L. Hulsart, P. Inacker, Y.C. Jing, V. Litvinenko, J. Ma, G.J. Mahler, M. Mapes, K. Mernick, K. Mihara, T.A. Miller, M.G. Minty, G. Narayan, F. Severino, K. Shih, Z. Sorrell, J.E. Tuozzolo, E. Wang, G. Wang, A. Zaltsman
    BNL, Upton, Long Island, New York, USA
  • I. Petrushina
    SUNY SB, Stony Brook, New York, USA
 
  Funding: Work supported by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886 with the U.S. Department of Energy.
Coherent electron cooling experiment is aimed for demonstration of the proof-of-principle demonstration of reduction energy spread of a single hadron bunch circulating in RHIC. The electron beam should have the required parameters and its orbit and energy should be matched to the hadron beam. In this paper we present the achieved electron beam parameters including emittance, energy spread, and other critical indicators. The operational issues as well as future plans are also discussed.
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2019-MOPMP050  
About • paper received ※ 15 May 2019       paper accepted ※ 20 May 2019       issue date ※ 21 June 2019  
Export • reference for this paper using ※ BibTeX, ※ LaTeX, ※ Text/Word, ※ RIS, ※ EndNote (xml)  
 
TUXXPLS1
SRF Gun with Warm Photocathode  
 
  • I. Pinayev, I. Ben-Zvi, J.C. Brutus, T. Hayes, Y.C. Jing, V. Litvinenko, J. Ma, K. Mihara, G. Narayan, F. Severino, K. Shih, J. Skaritka, E. Wang, G. Wang
    BNL, Upton, Long Island, New York, USA
  • I. Petrushina
    SUNY SB, Stony Brook, New York, USA
 
  Funding: Work supported by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886 with the U.S. Department of Energy.
The 113 MHz superconducting gun is used an electron source for the coherent electron cooling experiment. The unique feature of the gun is that a photocathode is held at room temperature. It allowed to preserve the quantum efficiency of Cs2KSb cathode which is adversely affected by cryogenic temperatures. Relatively low frequency permitted fully realize the accelerating field gradient what in in turn helps to achieve 10 nC charge and 0.3 microns normalized emittance. We present the achieved performance an operational experience as well.
 
slides icon Slides TUXXPLS1 [6.786 MB]  
Export • reference for this paper using ※ BibTeX, ※ LaTeX, ※ Text/Word, ※ RIS, ※ EndNote (xml)  
 
TUPTS079 Overcoming Multipacting Barriers in SRF Photoinjectors 2105
 
  • I. Petrushina
    SUNY SB, Stony Brook, New York, USA
  • V. Litvinenko, G. Narayan, I. Pinayev, F. Severino, K.S. Smith
    BNL, Upton, Long Island, New York, USA
  • V. Litvinenko
    Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, USA
 
  Superconducting RF (SRF) photoinjectors are considered to be a potential breakthrough in the area of high brightness electron sources. However, there is always the very important question of the compatibility of SRF cavities and high quantum efficiency (QE) photocathodes. A deposition of active elements from high QE photocathodes on the surface of a cavity makes it more vulnerable to multipacting (MP) and could affect the operation of an SRF gun. On the other side, MP can significantly reduce the lifetime of a photocathode. It is well known in the SRF community that a strong coupling, high forward power and sufficient cleanliness of cavity walls are the key components to overcome a low-level MP zone. In this paper we present a theoretical model of passing a MP barrier which could help estimate the desirable conditions for successful operation of an SRF gun. We demonstrate our results for the 113 MHz SRF photo-injector for Coherent electron Cooling (CeC) alongside with the experimental observations and 3D simulations of the MP discharge in the cavity. The results of the theoretical model and simulations show good agreement with the experimental results, and demonstrate that, if approached carefully, MP zones can be easily passed without any harm to the photocathode.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2019-TUPTS079  
About • paper received ※ 14 May 2019       paper accepted ※ 23 May 2019       issue date ※ 21 June 2019  
Export • reference for this paper using ※ BibTeX, ※ LaTeX, ※ Text/Word, ※ RIS, ※ EndNote (xml)  
 
TUPTS099 Predicting the Performances of Coherent Electron Cooling with Plasma Cascade Amplifier 2150
 
  • G. Wang, V. Litvinenko, J. Ma
    BNL, Upton, Long Island, New York, USA
  • V. Litvinenko
    Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, USA
 
  Funding: Work supported by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886 with the U.S. Department of Energy.
Recently, we proposed a new type of instability, Plasma Cascade Instability (PCI), to be used as the amplification mechanism of a Coherent Electron Cooling (CeC) system, which we call Plasma Cascade Amplifier (PCA). In this work, we present our analytical estimate of the cooling force as expected from a PCA- based CeC system and compare it with the simulation results. As examples, we apply our analysis to a few possible CeC systems and investigate the evolution of the circulating ion beams in the presence of cooling.
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2019-TUPTS099  
About • paper received ※ 15 May 2019       paper accepted ※ 23 May 2019       issue date ※ 21 June 2019  
Export • reference for this paper using ※ BibTeX, ※ LaTeX, ※ Text/Word, ※ RIS, ※ EndNote (xml)  
 
WEPGW105 Measuring Beam Parameters with Solenoid 2739
 
  • I. Pinayev, Y.C. Jing, D. Kayran, V. Litvinenko, K. Shih, G. Wang
    BNL, Upton, Long Island, New York, USA
  • I. Petrushina
    SUNY SB, Stony Brook, New York, USA
 
  Funding: Work supported by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886 with the U.S. Department of Energy.
We have developed methods of measuring electron beam energy and trajectory including angle and position based on the analysis of beam steering by a solenoid. Beam energy measurement is performed in the straight beamline and is suitable for the beams with substantial energy spread. In this paper, we describe the experimental set-up and the obtained results.
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2019-WEPGW105  
About • paper received ※ 15 May 2019       paper accepted ※ 23 May 2019       issue date ※ 21 June 2019  
Export • reference for this paper using ※ BibTeX, ※ LaTeX, ※ Text/Word, ※ RIS, ※ EndNote (xml)  
 
WEPRB094 Measurements of the Electrical Axes of the CeC PoP RF Cavities 3031
 
  • I. Petrushina
    SUNY SB, Stony Brook, New York, USA
  • Y.C. Jing, V. Litvinenko, J. Ma, I. Pinayev, K. Shih, G. Wang
    BNL, Upton, Long Island, New York, USA
  • V. Litvinenko
    Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, USA
  • K. Shih
    SBU, Stony Brook, New York, USA
 
  It is common knowledge that every mode in an SRF cavity has a so-called electrical axis, and only in an ideal cavity would this axis align exactly with the geometrical axis of the device. The misalignment of the electrical axis creates an additional undesirable transverse kick to the beam, which has to be corrected to achieve the designed beam parameters. In this paper we present the two methods which have been used in order to determine the electrical axes in the RF cavities of the Coherent electron Cooling (CeC) Proof of Principle (PoP) accelerator. The electron accelerator for the CeC PoP consists of the three main RF components: the 113 MHz SRF gun, the two normal-conducting 500 MHz bunching cavities, and the 704 MHz SRF 5-cell elliptical cavity. We discuss, in detail, the specifics of the measurement for each cavity and provide the corresponding results. In addition, we describe the influence of the field asymmetry in the 500 MHz bunchers on the beam dynamics, which was observed experimentally and confirmed by simulations.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2019-WEPRB094  
About • paper received ※ 14 May 2019       paper accepted ※ 20 May 2019       issue date ※ 21 June 2019  
Export • reference for this paper using ※ BibTeX, ※ LaTeX, ※ Text/Word, ※ RIS, ※ EndNote (xml)  
 
WEPTS092 3d Start-to-End Simulations of the Coherent Electron Cooling 3329
 
  • J. Ma, V. Litvinenko, G. Wang
    BNL, Upton, Long Island, New York, USA
  • V. Litvinenko
    Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, USA
 
  Coherent electron cooling (CeC) is a novel technique for rapidly cooling high-energy, high-intensity hadron beam. Two designs of coherent electron cooler, with a free electron laser (FEL) amplifier and a plasma-cascade micro-bunching amplifier, are cost effective and don’t require separation of hadrons and electrons. These schemes are used for the demonstration experiment in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). SPACE, a parallel, relativistic 3D electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell (PIC) code, has been used for simulation studies of these two coherent electron cooler systems.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2019-WEPTS092  
About • paper received ※ 15 April 2019       paper accepted ※ 22 May 2019       issue date ※ 21 June 2019  
Export • reference for this paper using ※ BibTeX, ※ LaTeX, ※ Text/Word, ※ RIS, ※ EndNote (xml)  
 
THPGW026 Status of the Horizon 2020 EuPRAXIA Conceptual Design Study 3638
 
  • M.K. Weikum, A. Aschikhin, R.W. Aßmann, R. Brinkmann, U. Dorda, A. Ferran Pousa, T. Heinemann, F. Jafarinia, A. Knetsch, C. Lechner, W. Leemans, B. Marchetti, A. Martinez de la Ossa, P. Niknejadi, J. Osterhoff, K. Poder, R. Rossmanith, L. Schaper, E.N. Svystun, G.E. Tauscher, P.A. Walker, J. Zhu
    DESY, Hamburg, Germany
  • T. Akhter, S. De Nicola
    INFN-Napoli, Napoli, Italy
  • D. Alesini, M.P. Anania, F.G. Bisesto, E. Chiadroni, M. Croia, A. Del Dotto, M. Ferrario, F. Filippi, A. Gallo, A. Giribono, R. Pompili, S. Romeo, J. Scifo, C. Vaccarezza, F. Villa
    INFN/LNF, Frascati, Italy
  • A.S. Alexandrova, R. Torres, C.P. Welsch, J. Wolfenden
    The University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom
  • A.S. Alexandrova, A. Beaton, J.A. Clarke, A.F. Habib, T. Heinemann, B. Hidding, P. Scherkl, N. Thompson, R. Torres, D. Ullmann, C.P. Welsch, S.M. Wiggins, J. Wolfenden, G.X. Xia
    Cockcroft Institute, Warrington, Cheshire, United Kingdom
  • N.E. Andreev, D. Pugacheva
    JIHT RAS, Moscow, Russia
  • N.E. Andreev, D. Pugacheva
    MIPT, Dolgoprudniy, Moscow Region, Russia
  • I.A. Andriyash, M.-E. Couprie, A. Ghaith, D. Oumbarek Espinos
    SOLEIL, Gif-sur-Yvette, France
  • T. Audet, B. Cros, G. Maynard
    CNRS LPGP Univ Paris Sud, Orsay, France
  • A. Bacci, D. Giove, V. Petrillo, A.R. Rossi, L. Serafini
    INFN-Milano, Milano, Italy
  • I.F. Barna, M.A. Pocsai
    Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, Budapest, Hungary
  • A. Beaton, A.F. Habib, T. Heinemann, B. Hidding, D.A. Jaroszynski, G.G. Manahan, P. Scherkl, Z.M. Sheng, D. Ullmann, S.M. Wiggins
    USTRAT/SUPA, Glasgow, United Kingdom
  • A. Beck, F. Massimo, A. Specka
    LLR, Palaiseau, France
  • A. Beluze, F. Mathieu, D.N. Papadopoulos
    LULI, Palaiseau, France
  • A. Bernhard, E. Bründermann, A.-S. Müller
    KIT, Karlsruhe, Germany
  • S. Bielawski, E. Roussel, C. Szwaj
    PhLAM/CERLA, Villeneuve d’Ascq, France
  • F. Brandi, G. Bussolino, L.A. Gizzi, P. Koester, L. Labate, B. Patrizi, G. Toci, P. Tomassini, M. Vannini
    INO-CNR, Pisa, Italy
  • M.H. Bussmann, A. Irman, U. Schramm
    HZDR, Dresden, Germany
  • M. Büscher, A. Lehrach
    FZJ, Jülich, Germany
  • A. Chancé, P.A.P. Nghiem, C. Simon
    CEA-IRFU, Gif-sur-Yvette, France
  • M. Chen, Z.M. Sheng
    Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China
  • A. Cianchi
    Università di Roma II Tor Vergata, Roma, Italy
  • A. Cianchi
    INFN-Roma II, Roma, Italy
  • J.A. Clarke, N. Thompson
    STFC/DL/ASTeC, Daresbury, Warrington, Cheshire, United Kingdom
  • J. Cole, S.M. Hooker, M.J.V. Streeter, R. Walczak
    JAI, Oxford, United Kingdom
  • P. A. Crump, M. Huebner
    FBH, Berlin, Germany
  • G. Dattoli, F. Nguyen
    ENEA C.R. Frascati, Frascati (Roma), Italy
  • N. Delerue, K. Wang
    LAL, Orsay, France
  • J.M. Dias, R.A. Fonseca, J.L. Martins, L.O. Silva, T. Silva, U. Sinha, J.M. Vieira
    IPFN, Lisbon, Portugal
  • R. Fedele, G. Fiore, D. Terzani
    UniNa, Napoli, Italy
  • A. Ferran Pousa, T. Heinemann, V. Libov
    University of Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany
  • M. Galimberti, P.D. Mason, R. Pattathil, D. Symes
    STFC/RAL, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon, United Kingdom
  • L.A. Gizzi, L. Labate
    INFN-Pisa, Pisa, Italy
  • F.J. Grüner, A.R. Maier
    CFEL, Hamburg, Germany
  • F.J. Grüner, O.S. Karger, A.R. Maier
    University of Hamburg, Institut für Experimentalphysik, Hamburg, Germany
  • C. Haefner, C. Siders
    LLNL, Livermore, California, USA
  • B.J. Holzer
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
  • S.M. Hooker
    University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom
  • T. Hosokai
    ISIR, Osaka, Japan
  • C. Joshi
    UCLA, Los Angeles, California, USA
  • M. Kaluza
    IOQ, Jena, Germany
  • M. Kaluza
    HIJ, Jena, Germany
  • M. Kando
    JAEA/Kansai, Kyoto, Japan
  • S. Karsch
    LMU, Garching, Germany
  • E. Khazanov, I. Kostyukov
    IAP/RAS, Nizhny Novgorod, Russia
  • D. Khikhlukha, D. Kocon, G. Korn, K.O. Kruchinin, A.Y. Molodozhentsev, L. Pribyl
    ELI-BEAMS, Prague, Czech Republic
  • O. S. Kononenko, A. Lifschitz
    LOA, Palaiseau, France
  • C. Le Blanc, Z. Mazzotta
    Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau, France
  • X. Li
    DESY Zeuthen, Zeuthen, Germany
  • V. Litvinenko
    BNL, Upton, Long Island, New York, USA
  • V. Litvinenko
    Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, USA
  • W. Lu
    TUB, Beijing, People’s Republic of China
  • O. Lundh
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden
  • V. Malka
    Weizmann Institute of Science, Physics, Rehovot, Israel
  • S. P. D. Mangles, Z. Najmudin, A. A. Sahai
    Imperial College of Science and Technology, Department of Physics, London, United Kingdom
  • A. Mostacci
    INFN-Roma, Roma, Italy
  • A. Mostacci
    Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy
  • C.D. Murphy
    York University, Heslington, York, United Kingdom
  • V. Petrillo
    Universita’ degli Studi di Milano, Milano, Italy
  • M. Rossetti Conti
    Universita’ degli Studi di Milano & INFN, Milano, Italy
  • G. Sarri
    Queen’s University of Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom
  • C.B. Schroeder
    LBNL, Berkeley, California, USA
  • C.-G. Wahlstrom
    Lund Institute of Technology (LTH), Lund University, Lund, Sweden
  • R. Walczak
    Oxford University, Physics Department, Oxford, Oxon, United Kingdom
  • G.X. Xia
    UMAN, Manchester, United Kingdom
  • M. Yabashi
    RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo, Japan
  • A. Zigler
    The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, The Racah Institute of Physics, Jerusalem, Israel
 
  Funding: This work was supported by the European Union’s Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation programme under grant agreement No. 653782.
The Horizon 2020 Project EuPRAXIA (European Plasma Research Accelerator with eXcellence In Applications) is producing a conceptual design report for a highly compact and cost-effective European facility with multi-GeV electron beams accelerated using plasmas. EuPRAXIA will be set up as a distributed Open Innovation platform with two construction sites, one with a focus on beam-driven plasma acceleration (PWFA) and another site with a focus on laser-driven plasma acceleration (LWFA). User areas at both sites will provide access to FEL pilot experiments, positron generation and acceleration, compact radiation sources, and test beams for HEP detector development. Support centres in four different countries will complement the pan-European implementation of this infrastructure.
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2019-THPGW026  
About • paper received ※ 26 April 2019       paper accepted ※ 20 May 2019       issue date ※ 21 June 2019  
Export • reference for this paper using ※ BibTeX, ※ LaTeX, ※ Text/Word, ※ RIS, ※ EndNote (xml)  
 
MOPRB087 Proposal for a High Transformer Ratio CW Dielectric Accelerator 773
 
  • V. Litvinenko
    Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, USA
  • J.C. Brutus, Y.C. Jing, I. Pinayev, G. Wang
    BNL, Upton, Long Island, New York, USA
  • M.E. Conde, C.-J. Jing, J.G. Power
    ANL, Argonne, Illinois, USA
  • A. Kanareykin
    Euclid Beamlabs LLC, Bolingbrook, USA
  • N. Vafaei
    UCLA, Los Angeles, California, USA
 
  Advanced CW accelerators are one of high priority directions identified by Advanced Accelerator Concepts Research Roadmap Workshop Report *. High transformer ratio of beam-driven accelerators is critically important for cost-effective FEL systems. We present a proposed experiment for demonstrating a high transformer ratio CW dielectric accelerator using operational SRF accelerator built for Coherent electron Cooling experiment. This accelerator operates with CW electron beam comprised of 78 kHz train of electron bunches. Electron bunches with controllable longitudinal and charge up to 10 nC per bunch are generated in 1.25 MV SRF photo-electron gun. This bunches are ballistically compressed to duration of 10-to-30 psec and accelerated to 15 MeV in SRF linac**. Such bunches would be excellent drivers of high-transformer ratio DWA accelerators. In this paper we present expected performance of proposed CW DWA accelerator.
*Advanced Accelerator Concepts Research Roadmap Workshop Report, 2016,
*V.N. Litvinenko et al., In proc.of FEL’17, Santa Fe, NM, USA, August 20-25, 2017, p. 132
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2019-MOPRB087  
About • paper received ※ 19 May 2019       paper accepted ※ 22 May 2019       issue date ※ 21 June 2019  
Export • reference for this paper using ※ BibTeX, ※ LaTeX, ※ Text/Word, ※ RIS, ※ EndNote (xml)  
 
TUPTS078 Coherent Electron Cooling (CeC) Experiment at RHIC: Status and Plans 2101
 
  • V. Litvinenko, K. Mihara
    Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, USA
  • Z. Altinbas, J.C. Brutus, A. Di Lieto, D.M. Gassner, T. Hayes, P. Inacker, J.P. Jamilkowski, Y.C. Jing, R. Kellermann, J. Ma, G.J. Mahler, M. Mapes, R.J. Michnoff, T.A. Miller, M.G. Minty, G. Narayan, M.C. Paniccia, D. Phillips, I. Pinayev, S.K. Seberg, F. Severino, J. Skaritka, L. Smart, K.S. Smith, Z. Sorrell, R. Than, J.E. Tuozzolo, E. Wang, G. Wang, Y.H. Wu, B. P. Xiao, T. Xin, A. Zaltsman
    BNL, Upton, Long Island, New York, USA
  • I. Petrushina
    SUNY SB, Stony Brook, New York, USA
  • K. Shih
    SBU, Stony Brook, New York, USA
 
  Funding: Work supported by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886 with the U.S. Department of Energy and NSF Grant No. PHY-141525
We will present currents status of the CeC experiment at RHIC and discuss plans for future. Special focus will be given to unexpected experimental results obtained during RHIC Run 18 and discovery of a previously unknown type of microwave instability. We called this new phenomenon micro-bunching Plasma Cascade Instability (PCI). Our plan for future experiments includes suppressing this instability in the CeC accelerator and using it as a broad-band amplifier in the CeC system.
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2019-TUPTS078  
About • paper received ※ 19 May 2019       paper accepted ※ 22 May 2019       issue date ※ 21 June 2019  
Export • reference for this paper using ※ BibTeX, ※ LaTeX, ※ Text/Word, ※ RIS, ※ EndNote (xml)  
 
WEPRB095 Microbunching Plasma-Cascade Instability 3035
 
  • V. Litvinenko
    Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, USA
  • T. Hayes, Y.C. Jing, D. Kayran, J. Ma, T.A. Miller, G. Narayan, I. Pinayev, F. Severino, G. Wang
    BNL, Upton, Long Island, New York, USA
  • I. Petrushina
    SUNY SB, Stony Brook, New York, USA
  • K. Shih
    SBU, Stony Brook, New York, USA
 
  Funding: Work supported by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886 with the U.S. Department of Energy and NSF Grant No. PHY-141525
We present a new type of longitudinal microbunching instability entitled ’Plasma-Cascade Instability’. This instability could occur in beams propagating along a straight section with external focusing elements. We present a theoretical description of this instability as well as self-consistent 3D simulations. Finally, we present results of experimental observation of Plasma-Cascade Instability at frequencies up to 10 THz using SRF linear accelerator built for Coherent electron Cooling experiment *.
* Commissioning of FEL-based Coherent electron Cooling system, V.N. Litvinenko et al., In proc. of 38th Int. Free Electron Laser Conf.(FEL’17), Santa Fe, NM, USA, August 20-25, 2017, p. 132
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2019-WEPRB095  
About • paper received ※ 18 May 2019       paper accepted ※ 23 May 2019       issue date ※ 21 June 2019  
Export • reference for this paper using ※ BibTeX, ※ LaTeX, ※ Text/Word, ※ RIS, ※ EndNote (xml)